Product Pipeline

GENE THERAPIES

Preclinical
Phase I/II
Phase III
Marketed

METABOLIC

ABO-102 (sc AAV-SGSH) : Sanfilippo Syndrome Type A (MPS IIIA)
Current
ABO-101 (AAV-NAGLU) : Sanfilippo syndrome Type B (MPS IIIB)
Current
ABO-201 (sc AAV-CLN3) : Juvenile Batten disease (CLN3)
Current
ABO-202 (AAV-CLN1): Infantile Batten disease (CLN1)
Current

DERMATOLOGY

EB-101 (LZRSE-Col7A1) : Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB)
Current
EB-201 (AAV-DJCol7A1): Epidermolysis bullosa (EB)
Current

HEMATOLOGY

ABO-301 (AAV-FANCC): Fanconi anemia (FA)
Current
ABO-302 (CRISPR-Cas9): Rare Blood diseases
Current

AAV VECTOR PLATFORM

Preclinical
Phase I/II
Phase III
Marketed
AIM™ Vectors: 2nd Gen and New AAV Products
Current

Orphan Drug Designation (FDA) Orphan Drug Designation (EU) Rare Pediatric Disease Designation (FDA) Fast Track Designation (FDA) Breakthrough Therapy Designation (FDA)

Abeona is developing next generation adeno-associated viral (AAV)-based gene therapies for MPS III (Sanfilippo syndrome), which involves a one-time delivery of a normal copy of the defective gene to cells of the central nervous system with the aim of reversing the effects of the genetic errors that cause the disease.

After a single dose in Sanfilippo preclinical models, ABO-101 and ABO-102 induced cells in the CNS and peripheral organs to produce the missing enzymes and help repair damage caused to the cells. Preclinical in vivo efficacy studies in Sanfilippo syndrome have demonstrated functional benefits that remain for months after treatment. A single dose of AB0-101 or AB0-102 significantly restored normal cell and organ function, corrected cognitive defects that remained months after drug administration, increased neuromuscular control and increased the lifespan of animals with MPS III over 100% one year after treatment compared to untreated control animals. These results are consistent with studies from several laboratories suggesting AAV treatment could potentially benefit patients with for Sanfilippo Syndrome Type A and B, respectively. In addition, safety studies conducted in animal models of Sanfilippo syndromes have demonstrated that delivery of AB0-101 or AB0-102 are well tolerated with minimal side effects.

ABO-201 (scAAV9 CLN3) is an AAV-based gene therapy which has shown promising preclinical efficacy in delivery of a normal copy of the defective CLN3 gene to cells of the central nervous system with the aim of reversing the effects of the genetic errors that cause juvenile Batten disease.

Juvenile Batten disease (JBD) is a rare, fatal, autosomal recessive (inherited) disorder of the nervous system that typically begins in children between 4 and 8 years of age. Often the first noticeable sign of JBD is vision impairment, which tends to progress rapidly and eventually result in blindness. As the disease progresses, children experience the loss of previously acquired skills (developmental regression). This progression usually begins with the loss of the ability to speak in complete sentences. Children then lose motor skills, such as the ability to walk or sit. They also develop movement abnormalities that include rigidity or stiffness, slow or diminished movements (hypokinesia), and stooped posture. Beginning in mid- to late childhood, affected children may have recurrent seizures (epilepsy), heart problems, behavioral problems, and difficulty sleeping. Life expectancy is greatly reduced. Most people with juvenile Batten disease live into their twenties or thirties. As yet, no specific treatment is known that can halt or reverse the symptoms of juvenile Batten disease.

ABO-301 (AAV LK19 FANCC) is an AAV-based gene therapy which has shown promising preclinical efficacy in delivery of a normal copy of the defective gene to cells of the hematopoietic or blood system with the aim of reversing the effects of the genetic errors that cause Fanconi anemia.

The major function of bone marrow is to produce new blood cells. In FA, a DNA mutation renders the FANCC gene nonfunctional. Loss of FANCC causes patient skeletal abnormalities and leads to bone marrow failure. Fanconi Anemia patients also have much higher rates of hematological diseases, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or tumors of the head, neck, skin, gastrointestinal system, or genital tract. The likelihood of developing one of these cancers in people with Fanconi anemia is between 10 and 30 percent. Aside from bone marrow transplantation (BMT) there are no specific treatments known that can halt or reverse the symptoms of FA. Reparing fibroblast cells in FA patients with a functional FANCC gene is the focus of our AAV-based gene therapy approach.

Using a novel CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein 9) system, researchers used a protein-RNA complex composed of an enzyme known as Cas9 bound to a guide RNA molecule that has been designed to recognize a particular DNA sequence. The RNA molecules guide the Cas9 complex to the location in the genome that requires repair. CRISPR-Cas9 uniquely enables surgically efficient knock-out, knock-down or selective editing of defective genes in the context of their natural promoters, unlocking the potential to treat both recessive and dominant forms of genetic diseases. Most importantly, this approach has the potential to allow safer, more precise gene modification for a wide range of rare blood diseases.

EB-101 is an ex vivo gene therapy for the treatment of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) that has demonstrated promising Phase 1 results in adult RDEB patients.
EB-201 (AAV DJ Col7A1) pre-clinical candidate uses a novel (homologous recombination), targeted AAV-meditated gene editing and delivery approach to correct gene mutations in skin cells (Keratinocytes). The AAV DJ delivers native COL7A1 gene fragment into effected cells and induces homologous recombination to fix genomic copy of mutated gene. This novel approach possess relatively high recombination frequency and low off-target changes, and doesn’t require introduction of bacterial proteins (like Cas9) to stimulate recombination so potentially can be used for gene editing in vivo
 

PLASMA THERAPIES

Research
Preclinical
Phase I/II
Marketed
SDF™ ALPHA (AIPI): Inherited COPD
Current
SDF™ GAMMA (IVIG): Autoimmunie, infectious diseases
Current
Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (Alpha-1) is a rare (1 in 1,500 to 3,500) genetic (inherited) autosomal disorder that may cause lung disease and liver disease from retained misfolded protein. Abeona Therapeutics is developing PTB-101 SDF Alpha™ (alpha1-proteinase inhibitor) for chronic augmentation and maintenance therapy in adults with clinically evident emphysema due to severe deficiency of alpha1-proteinase inhibitor.

Gene Therapy

Gene therapy is the use of DNA as a potential therapy to treat a disease. In many disorders, particularly genetic diseases caused by a single genetic defect, gene therapy aims to treat a disease by delivering the correct copy of DNA into a patient’s cells.
Learn More »